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Everything You Should Know about Your New ZEISS Precision Lenses

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See the world in living colour!

ZEISS' coloured lenses really set the mood!

Choosing the right spectacles for your type is an individual process, especially now, that applies not only to frames, but also to the colour of the prescription spectacle lenses. Of course, people have always worn slightly coloured lenses with hints of grey, blue or brown, but what about spicy red, sweet violet and pretty pink? These bright trendy colours give you fascinating insights and views – with the ZEISS colour range for prescription spectacle lenses.

Colours have an immense influence on our mood and thoughts. This has now been scientifically proven. The German universal genius and author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe took an in-depth look at this topic over 200 years ago in his theory of colours. His recommendation: "Look at a blue circle for a time, and then the liberated eye will seem enlightened as by the sun, even if the day is grey and the surroundings are autumnally colourless." Goethe would definitely have chosen spectacles with coloured lenses made by ZEISS – with either a single colour, a graduated tint or a trendy bicolour version. That would have made him a fashion icon too.

Choosing the right coloured lenses

See the world in living colour!

If you want to follow Goethe's recommendations, you can ask your optician to show you the various tints. Talk to him about when you primarily intend to use the coloured lenses as sunglasses, daily or only for special occasions; and then ask the question which may be more difficult to answer: which colour to choose? ZEISS' new colour range includes a first-class premium selection: black, brown, grey, grey-green, blue and rosé for single colour lenses; black, brown, grey, grey-green, blue and grey-blue for graduated tints; and pistachio, cinnamon, stone and jeans for the bicolour lenses. There are also trendy fashion colours. As fascinating as these vibrant colours are – unless you plan to own more than one pair of spectacles, less is more when it comes to colour. You should also choose a light tint if you plan to wear the spectacles frequently or for extended periods. The eyes' sensitivity to light also plays a part when choosing coloured lenses. It is also important that people can still see your eyes clearly. The best thing to do is go to your optician in your favourite outfit, which will help him to help you find the perfect colour and tint. When choosing colours, women should apply their usual eye make-up and choose the tint accordingly. You should also consider which clothes you wear often. This makes it easier for your optician to coordinate the colour choice of the prescription spectacle lens tint from his collection.

Free-time fashion or business spectacles?

There is one other important aspect to consider when choosing a colour: are the spectacles for private use only or are they part of your career plans? If you wear spectacles at work, your choice will of course depend on the industry. For models or designers, the colours can't be loud enough. However, if you plan to sell shares or insurance, pink prescription spectacle lenses could be misunderstood. After all, colour has an external effect, too. Grey and brown make a conservative, relaxed impression, while violet epitomises creativity, innovation and self-confidence. Some compromises are required for work, but you can show your true colours and highlight your personality in your free time. Yellow and orange lenses suit cheerful people, red is ideal for active individuals, while green and blue are perfect for relaxed, friendly characters. Fans of pink and purple are full of ideas. Grey and brown prescription spectacle lenses appear rather conservative and often even boring.

However, we have to make one restriction here: not all coloured lenses are suitable for driving. Your ophthalmic optician will advise you in detail.

Do you want your colour to be unique?

Do you want your colour to be unique?

Do you want even more individuality? Then have the colour mixed just for you. You can give your ophthalmic optician an item of clothing - maybe your wedding outfit - or an accessory, and they will make the ZEISS colour prescription spectacle lenses to match it. You will then receive something very unique. With the new and modernised range of colours, which focuses on the latest styles and trends, almost any lens colour is possible. ZEISS has also optimised the variety of materials for prescription spectacle lenses. With the new extended and global standard colour range, almost every customer request and requirement can be fulfilled.

This also applies to prescription spectacle lenses without optical power. If a consumer falls in love with a certain spectacle frame, but does not like the prescription spectacle lenses, the optician can use the ZEISS colour range to add more colour to your life.

Five at once

Here are five more convincing reasons why you should colour your single vision, multi-vision or progressive lenses. First, Skylet tints can increase contrast; second, tinted lenses reduce the impact of bright artificial light; third, they help you see even the smallest details better; fourth, they increase visual comfort. And last but not least, coloured lenses just look great and make every simple outfit into an individual look.

I see the world as I like it
Looking through red prescription spectacle lenses gives you strength; yellow lenses put you in a good mood. Colour therapy impacts our mood positively.

Coloured lenses and make-up – find the right mix
We want to see colour, but not look like a paint box. That is why you should get to know the tricks make-up artists use.

Fashionable insights: colour goes fashion
Pink, orange, purple, turquoise – colours will be in again this summer. Complete the look with coloured lenses.

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